JL Careers Blog

Network Strategically for the Results You Want

Networking can be a wild card. Uncertainty about what to say, social anxiety, and fear of rejection can creep in and undermine the efforts of even the most outgoing personality. Still, we limp along to company events and conventions, ready to make our best attempt at networking. Hoping somewhere along the way the fruits of our labor will show themselves in a tangible way.

Break the Cycle of Ineffective Networking

Networking without a plan is just wasting time. Keith Ferrazzi; national best-selling author of “Never Eat Alone” and one of the world’s most “connected” people, advises the foundation of fruitful networking is preparation.

There are two critical steps: research and thoughtful consideration. Ideally, you’ll have at least two weeks to begin the process.

  1. Research which companies and representatives will be at the event. Create mini-bios for everyone you think is or could be an influencer. That includes professionals in leadership roles, those who may be doing new things in your industry, and people you want to meet - regardless of title or reputation. 
     
  2. Once you’ve created your short list of people you want to talk with, consider what you’d like to discuss. Come up with a list of at least three questions you could ask these individuals.

While networking, think of questions that are specific to that person. For example, what questions can you ask them that are specific to their career or organization?  Giving your questions thoughtful consideration increases the likelihood that you’ll have a meaningful conversation with these professionals and will lead them to remember you.

Build Lasting Relationships by Being Prepared

The adage of “working the room” and getting as many business cards as you can is dated. Today, it’s about building real relationships - one person at a time. Sure, you may not shake as many hands, but those you do will be that much more likely to remember you later. Moreover, that’s where you’ll begin to see results. We can’t influence people if they don’t know, like, and trust us.

Jen Plaza, networking expert and owner of Plaza Consulting Services, readily builds relationships with executives and decision makers. Jen shares, “It’s not about networking, it’s about relationship building,” adding, “everyone has a story, and I’m curious to find out what that is.”

Finding commonality is a fundamental aspect of relationship building. Focus on finding a way to connect with the people you talk to in a meaningful way. It’s ok to step outside the industry paradigm and connect on a personal level too. Even if we aren’t in the same business, we often face similar challenges.

Great networkers take a more in-depth approach whether they’re connecting over business or personal matters. Instead of asking the top-of-mind questions, they do a little friendly investigating. Some questions work particularly well for this including How’s your business doing in this market?’ and, ‘What type of projects have you been involved with lately?’ When striking up a more personal conversation, they may inquire about the person’s family, upcoming travel plans or even their personal interests.

Reinvent the Way You Network Today

Get results faster by getting started now. Finding what works best for you is going to require a bit of practice and will probably include a few fumbles. Don’t give up. You’ve got your whole career to hone your networking skills. Incorporate these quick tips into your socializing repertoire for maximum impact:

  1. Have an elevator pitch: When people ask what you do, be prepared to tell them in an exciting and succinct way. Keep your energy upbeat but not over the top. Think of your elevator pitch as a Verbal Business Card. 
     
  2. Don’t be afraid to be seen alone: Making your way through the crowd with a colleague or two in tow can be tempting, but you’re more likely to put yourself out there and encourage conversations if you strike out alone. Plus, you’re more approachable. Think about the last time you tried to start up a discussion with a group vs. one person. Which did you prefer?
     
  3. Take the initiative and break the ice: Starting a conversation is the hardest part of networking. You can tackle this challenge by preparing a mix of generic and more targeted questions in advance.
     
  4. Check your body language: Unconscious body cues can either draw people to us or drive them away. To that end, negative body language can thwart our best efforts. Be aware of your posture and unconscious movements. Read more about the power of body language:  Is Your Body Language Impacting your Career Advancement?
     
  5. Listen for opportunities to help: As people speak with you, listen for their problem points. If any ring a bell, think of a way you may be able to help that person overcome the problem.  It could be as simple as sharing how you dealt with a similar hurdle or introducing them to someone who has the connections or expertise to help.
     
  6. Get comfortable with being uncomfortable: The more you practice putting yourself into uncomfortable situations, the easier it becomes to handle them with grace. Relax. Take a moment and observe the room before you leap into conversations. Determine who is present and whom you would like to talk with. Have a few icebreakers ready and review those in-depth questions you want to ask.
     
  7. Find someone who’s a natural and learn by observing: Great networkers are usually pretty easy to spot. They’re the ones who leave you feeling energized after a conversation and people are lining up to talk to. Be a fly on the wall. Observe how they network and listen to the questions they ask. Then adopt their best practices.

How you approach networking can make or break your career. In our fast-paced world every chance to make an impression matters. We’re confident that if you continue to practice strategic networking, you’re going to get the results you want.

Ready to take your career to the next level? Get targeted advice to advance your career and accelerate your professional success, contact us today.

Author: Joanne Loberg of JL Careers Inc. is a Certified Executive Coach and Internationally Certified Career Management Professional. She has a reputation as a highly sought-after Career Consultant and she has been referred to as "an absolute expert at navigating the complex territory of career advancement.” Joanne provides leadership coaching as well as career transition coaching, career planning workshops, and job search services (resumes, LinkedIn profiles, cover letters, and interview practice) for Professionals and Executives. Copyright 2018 JL Careers Inc. All rights reserved.

Wishing you much career success!

Joanne Loberg
Certified Executive Coach & Internationally Certified Career Management Professional
JL Careers Inc

Is Your Body Language Hurting Your Career Advancement?

You are focused on driving results, achieving your operational objectives, raising your profile and building key relationships, but you are still being passed over. 

One factor to consider is what recruiters refer to as ‘executive presence’.  A big component of ‘executive presence’ is positive body language which Forbes’ article: Do You Have ‘Executive Presence’ defines as the ability to command a room. People stop and listen when you speak because you project confidence, decisiveness and are calm under pressure.

Executive presence matters when it comes to advancing your career.  TalentSmart studied more than one million people and identified how body language impacts what others think of you and more importantly, what hiring managers consider good and promotable body language. 
 

What Your Body Language is Saying about You

From first impressions to how you show up at meetings, your body language conveys your self confidence, approachability, receptiveness and ability to collaborate with others.

Do a Quick Audit:

At your last meeting, did you appear to be rushed, unprepared, and disheveled?  Or did you block 15 to 20 minutes in advance to plan and be purposeful about how you could contribute to the meeting.  When speaking, were you poised, calm and decisive when communicating your ideas, recommendations or providing feedback. 

Did you build rapport and influence engagement by leaning in when talking with someone, using good eye contact, and demonstrating open body language (versus closed off, with your arms crossed)?

Were you distracted, fidgeting or looking over the person’s shoulder or at the clock?  Your body language tells your audience if you are truly interested in engaging in a conversation and working collaboratively.   Of note, fidgeting - whether playing with your pen, doodling or shifting in your seat can be perceived as lacking confidence.

These factors can contribute to creating a negative impression of you as a leader.  And when being considered for career advancement opportunities, perceptions can matter.

Thinking this doesn’t count in our tele-mobile world?  Sorry, it does.  Body language can be conveyed over the phone.  We coach our clients preparing for telephone interviews or critical conference calls to stand up or sit-up straight, and smile as these behaviours transmit confidence and approachability.

5 Tips to Build Your Body Language and Executive Presence: 

 

  1. Get Feedback:  Ask two or three people for their honest feedback about your body language and how you project yourself.  Reach out to your mentor and gain their insights on how you could present yourself more effectively.  Read about how to source a mentor in:  Who’s Your Mentor?
     
  2. Purposeful Planning:  If you want to be perceived as confident, decisive and ‘on top of your game’, you can’t wing the meetings you attend.  Your body language will give it away.  Invest time in advance to prepare what you want to present and anticipate key questions that the senior leaders might ask.  This will keep your jitters at bay and help you navigate challenging conversations. 
     
  3. Hone Your Communication Skills:  Shying away from Boardroom conversations?  Finding yourself sitting quietly and only commenting when called on?  This isn’t how to earn your stripes.  Project confidence by building your public speaking skills.  JL Careers Leadership Coaching and Toastmasters can help you master the skills to think on your feet and present with confidence, clarity and passion. 
     
  4. Practice Your Power Poses:Before your next big meeting or a challenging conversation practice your power poses. Standing in the posture of confidence – head up, shoulders back – even when you don’t feel confident can make the difference between showing up as capable and confident, or unsure and nervous.   Read about Power Poses in: Ace the Interview:  What’s Your Body Language Saying About You?
     
  5. Master Difficult Conversations:  Become an expert at navigating challenging conversations.  Watch the body language of respected senior leaders and observe how they handle conflict.  Do they act defensively and territorial, or do they lean in to listen and understand the other person’s perspective?  When someone states something you disagree with try asking questions to understand where they are coming from before engaging with them.  The most powerful question you can ask is: ‘Tell me more about that.’  By asking this question you gain critical insights about their needs and you take yourself off the hot seat and buy yourself time to think through your response.

Advancing to the top takes more than grit and hard work.  It’s also about how you are perceived.  Consider, what is your body language saying about you.  Are you projecting confidence, approachability and poise under pressure?  It’s an important question to ask as your body language might be costing you your next promotion.

Author: Joanne Loberg of JL Careers Inc. is a Certified Executive Coach and Internationally Certified Career Management Professional. She has a reputation as a highly sought after Career Consultant and she has been referred to as "an absolute expert at navigating the complex territory of career advancement.” Joanne provides leadership coaching as well as career transition coaching, career planning workshops, and job search services (resumes, LinkedIn profiles, cover letters, and interview practice) for Professionals and Executives. Copyright 2018 JL Careers Inc. All rights reserved.

Wishing you much career success!

Joanne Loberg

Certified Executive Coach & Internationally Certified Career Management Professional

JL Careers Inc

Managing Difficult Conversations

Difficult conversations in the workplace are inevitable, whether it’s discussing a poor performance review or explaining a project delay to a client.

What’s the best way to approach these tense interactions? 

Avoidance is always a possibility, but it’s only a temporary fix and it could potentially make the problem worse. Furthermore, avoiding uncomfortable conversations can actually have serious repercussions to the business as a whole. 

New York Times bestselling author, Joseph Grenny of Crucial Conversations, advises “One of the most costly barriers to organizational performance is unresolved crucial conversations.”

This is why the best approach is to address the problem of difficult conversations head on. But how? What if you’re naturally uncomfortable with conflict or feel uncertain about what to say or do?

It all Starts with Planning 

Challenging conversations are rarely successfully handled by winging it and hoping you get a positive outcome. Preparing in advance can help you overcome your fears and thus approach the situation with clarity and confidence.

If you’re struggling with how to handle an upcoming conversation that has the potential to be difficult, here are a few things you can do now to improve the desired outcome.

Ask yourself these two key questions:

1. What is the outcome I want to achieve?

According to HBR, “the key in any tough talk is to always keep sight of the goal.” The key to success is to go into these conversations with a "clear, realistic preferred outcome; the knowledge of how you want your working relationship with your counterpart to be; and having done some careful thinking about any obstacles that could interfere with either.”

2. What am I afraid of?

One of the biggest barriers to approaching difficult conversations is fear. To overcome this, you must be honest about what’s holding you back. Is it fear of not being heard? Concern over the possibility of yelling or threats? Worry over the potential loss of a relationship?

Once you’ve figured out what’s causing your discomfort, begin addressing each concern before engaging in the conversation. For instance, if you’re afraid of a volatile situation, getting HR involved right from the start can help prevent such a scenario from occurring.

Map Out a Plan

Script out what you want to say to start the conversation. Briefly state the issue at hand, what your goal is and your desired outcome.

Be sure to devise a strategy to deal with the potential reactions that may occur. This includes how your counterpart might react as well as what you may feel based on those reactions.

Try to anticipate what the other party may say or do during the conversation and determine the best way to respond to each potential scenario.

Diane Ross, author of Elephant Conversations, suggests that to manage difficult conversations you need to “anticipate their reaction.” As an expert negotiator, she finds this “takes the sting out of reactions…prevents you from overreacting”.

More Secrets to Communication Success…

  • Your body language can play a significant role in how a challenging conversation will ultimately pan out.  Practice your ‘Power Poses’ [Source:  Amy Cuddy – TED talk:  Your body language may shape who you are] to ensure you remain focused and confident during these challenging conversations.
     
  • Realize your biggest strength is your ability to listen. Your goal should be to understand where the other party is coming from and what is fueling their behaviour. Remember – conversations are supposed to be two-way streets. Say what you need to say, then let the other party do the same.
     
  • If the conversation goes sideways, instead of reacting, take a step back and ask the other party to reiterate or explain their point in greater detail. Saying something as simple as, “Tell me more about that,” can help flesh out the issue at hand and demonstrate that you really are interested in resolving the situation versus defending your position.
     
  • During the conversation avoid ‘rabbit holes’. Stay centred and don’t allow yourself to get off track. To help you stay focused on your objective, write these potential ‘rabbit hole’ items on a piece of paper. If they arise, don’t respond. Instead, focus on the topic at hand and continue to listen. 

Difficult conversations, though challenging for both parties involved, enable people to learn, grow and make better decisions. When handled correctly, they can result in positive, productive outcomes and even enable breakthroughs in relationships.

The tips above will empower you to enter even the most challenging interactions with poise, confidence, control and positivity.

Author: Joanne Loberg of JL Careers Inc. is a Certified Executive Coach and Internationally Certified Career Management Professional.  She has a reputation as a highly sought after Career Consultant and she has been referred to as "an absolute expert at navigating the complex territory of career advancement.” Joanne provides leadership coaching as well as career transition coaching, career planning workshops, and job search services (resumes, LinkedIn profiles, cover letters, and interview practice) for Professionals and Executives. Copyright 2018 JL Careers Inc. All rights reserved.

Wishing you much career success!

Joanne Loberg
Certified Executive Coach & Internationally Certified Career Management Professional
JL Careers Inc

5 Factors Critical to Successfully Starting a New Job

You have 90 days to fit into your new organization’s culture.  From building key relationships, figuring out the communication channels, determining how decisions are made, identifying whether they focus on group or individual contributions, and evaluating their appetite for change, HBR outlines 5 critical factors: When you Start A New Job, Pay Attention to These 5 Aspects of Company Culture.   

How you choose to spend your first 90 days is vital to your success in your new position.  Your boss and other executives will be watching you to see if you are able to deliver.  Devise a Game Plan for Success to propel your career forward in your new organization. 

Wishing you much career success,

Joanne

Certified Executive Coach & Internationally Certified Career Management Professional

JL Careers Inc

Targeting the C-Suite: 6 Strategies for Career Advancement

Climb the Corporate Ladder Faster

Are you doing everything you can to make it to the top?  The key to success is to understand the talent landscape and then strategically lay out a plan to advance your career. Here are 6 strategies to propel your career forward:

1. Determine Who’s at the Front of the Line

“Know how long you’ll be in line. If you are the number two executive and the current C-suite leader is young, well-liked, and only two years into her tenure, you’re looking at a lengthy wait. Conversely, if you’re the heir apparent and your boss has said he would like to do something new in one to two years, your time may be close at hand” recommends Cisco Systems’ Cassandra Frangos, VP Global Executive & Organizational Development. (Source: Harvard Business Review: How to Get on the Shortlist for the C-Suite)

2. Build a Strategic Focus

Making it to the C-Suite requires that you go beyond your functional role according to Harvard Business Review (HBR).

Broaden your experience and reputation by taking on stretch assignments.  And don’t be afraid to step up and state your desire to take on a more challenging leadership role delivering key initiatives, such as a merger or acquisition, or managing a new subsidiary.

3. Raise Your Profile 

Too often we have our heads down immersed in the critical demands of our roles, but it is important to also be organizationally savvy – that is, to be keenly aware of what’s going on across the organization. Networking within your division is great but expanding that network across the organization will produce better results faster. As you make these connections, listen in to learn about the critical issues impacting other divisions and determine how you can collaborate to deliver results.

4. Build a Roster of Champions

There is an abundance of influence at your disposal when you create a network of champions to support your career success. These invaluable connections can help open doors by promoting your achievements and being your advocate.

5. Know Yourself

Consider your leadership style and play to it to carve out your unique and value-added brand.  HBR highlights three unique styles. Are you a ‘disrupter’ who shakes up organizations and drives change?  A ‘turnaround leader’ who fixes failing operations? Or, are you a ‘stabilizer,’ called on to maintain profitability and growth in mature businesses?  Figure out your leadership sweet spot and use it to achieve results that make you stand out as C-Suite potential.

6. Close Your Gaps

In addition to understanding your strengths, also determine your development areas and work quickly to close the gap. Ask your manager and your mentors for critical feedback as to how you are perceived as a leader, what your strengths are and, most importantly, your leadership blindspots?

Then, be proactive about bridging the distance between where you are and where you’d like to be.  Work with your manager, mentor or an Executive Coach to devise strategies to close the gap.  By doing so you demonstrate to senior leaders you know how to work with criticism, are focused on learning and developing, and have the willingness and capability to address challenges and grow from them. 

Making it to the top of the corporate ladder requires more than just grit and determination. It takes planning and the ability to think long-term and big-picture. These career advancement tips can launch you on the trajectory to the career growth you desire.

Author: Joanne Loberg of JL Careers Inc. is a Certified Executive Coach and Internationally Certified Career Management Professional.  She has a reputation as a highly sought after Career Consultant and she has been referred to as "an absolute expert at navigating the complex territory of career advancement.” Joanne provides leadership coaching as well as career transition coaching, career planning workshops, and job search services (resumes, LinkedIn profiles, cover letters, and interview practice) for Professionals and Executives. Copyright 2018 JL Careers Inc. All rights reserved.

Accelerate your Performance and Enhance your Success

Joanne Loberg, Certified Executive Coach and Internationally Certified Career Management Professional, is committed and highly skilled in supporting executives and emerging leaders to envision, strategize and accelerate their career success.

Coaching focuses on strategies for excelling in organizations and overcoming road blocks to success. Joanne asks challenging questions that provide insight and clarity. Once your goals are articulated, Joanne coaches you to develop and implement strategies that deliver results.

Let’s connect for a complimentary 20-minute telephone consultation to determine what you can do to move your career forward.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Joanne Loberg
Certified Executive Coach & Internationally Certified Career Management Professional
JL Careers Inc

Applicant Tracking Systems: What You Need to Know When Job Searching

Applying for jobs with large corporations and government agencies?  Often their recruitment teams use Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) to electronically screen the hundreds, and sometimes thousands, of applications they receive each day.  And only "25% of applicants make it through the initial electronic resume screening process" (source: Elizabeth Magill: Big Interview)

To be successful in today’s competitive job market, you need an accomplishment and keyword-rich resume that can be easily converted into a Text based resume to ensure these ATS select your resume.

How Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) Work

These resume robots remove all formatting from your resume and then scan for specific recognized keywords and phrases.  Next, they sort the content of your resume into four categories:  1. Education, 2. Contact Information, 3. Skills, 4. Work Experience.  Your resume is then scored related to these keywords.  If your rating is high enough, your resume is added to the list of potential interview candidates.

It All Starts with the Job Posting

The first step in optimizing your resume is to fully review the job posting you are targeting.  Highlight keywords noting the skills and experience required.  Next, update the Profile and Professional Experience sections of your resume to ensure you are using these keywords. 

Making it easy:  Use Cloud Services to help develop your resume.  TagCrowd  will identify the keywords in the job posting along with the frequency of these words.  Just copy and paste the job posting into TagCrowd and it will generate a list of keywords that need to appear in your resume.  Inversely you can do the same for your resume to determine if you have noted the required keywords.

Formatting for ATS

As ATS are using algorithms to review resumes, Magill suggests you:

  • Repeatedly use the keywords and phrases.  Ideally these should be repeated a minimum of two or three times.
  • Don’t just add keywords but instead create meaningful bullets describing how you used this skill and the outcome or results you gained. 
  • Delete your headers and footers.
  • Don’t just use acronyms.  To ensure your resume gets picked up spell out your titles, degrees and certifications as well as other industry lingo to cover all your bases.
  • Note your address including your postal code as some resume robots will eliminate your application if this is missing.

Then, streamline your resume presentation and delete any fancy formatting, graphics, logos, tables or columns.  Business Insider recommends you use font size 11 and Verdana or Tahoma font styles to ensure scanning ease. 

Lastly, don’t worry about the length of your resume.  ATS formatted resumes are much longer due to the fact you need a separate line for each piece of information.  i.e. the company name is on a separate line from the title of the role, and so follows with your dates of employment. 

When dealing with these ATS resume robots we basically have two objectives:  1. delete any fancy formatting in order to create an easily scannable resume, and 2. get busy using keywords and phrases throughout your resume to highlight your relevant skills and experience.

Author: Joanne Loberg of JL Careers Inc. is a Certified Executive Coach and Internationally Certified Career Management Professional.  She has a reputation as a highly sought after Career Consultant and she has been referred to as "an absolute expert at navigating the complex territory of career advancement.” Joanne provides leadership coaching as well as career transition coaching, career planning workshops, and job search services (resumes, LinkedIn profiles, cover letters, and interview practice) for Professionals and Executives. Copyright 2018 JL Careers Inc. All rights reserved.

Not Landing Interviews?

JL Careers specializes in working with professionals and executives to develop accomplishment-based resumes, cover letters, and LinkedIn profiles that grab recruiters' attention. Let’s connect for a complimentary 20-minute telephone Career Consultation to determine what you need to do to start landing interviews and job offers today.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Joanne Loberg
Certified Executive Coach & Internationally Certified Career Management Professional
JL Careers Inc
 

5 Tips for Networking in a Small City

Vancouver-based JL Careers provides career management and leadership strategies for Executives and Professionals across North America.  As a media contributor Joanne Loberg was quoted in Huffington Post’s – 5 tips for Networking in a Small City on creative ways to network and connect when you are looking for a new job.  
 
If you are interested in JL Careers contributing to a segment on career planning, transition or leadership coaching please contact us.

Want to Stand Out in Your Job Search? Brand Yourself

How did Sheryl Sandberg land the role of COO at Facebook?  It’s not just because she had an impressive resume or noteworthy references. The reason she scored this top position in a Fortune 500 company is because she built an outstanding personal brand.

From a marketing perspective, branding helps companies carve out a niche within their chosen industry. It provides a unique identity and enables them to stand out from the competition.

That same concept can also be applied to people through career branding. A career brand enables prospective employers to easily understand who you are, what professional skills you bring to the table and whether you would be a good fit within their organization. Like traditional branding, career branding also allows you to differentiate yourself from other candidates.

“All of us need to understand the importance of branding. We are CEOs of our own companies: Me Inc. To be in business today, our most important job is to be head marketer for the brand called You.”  - Tom Peters, 'The Red Bull of Management Thinkers' in an interview with Fast Company.

A career branding statement can be used when discussing your career development plan with your manager, during your networking activities, when promoting yourself in interviews or when evaluating job opportunities to ensure they align with what is most important to you. In other words, it’s like a blueprint for your future success.

So, what exactly does the process of career branding entail? Well, it’s a lot more than just brushing up your resume and keeping your LinkedIn profile up to date. Rather than a one-off or temporary activity, creating and maintaining your own personal brand should be part of a long-term career strategy. In fact, career branding is so important that I often speak to professional associations, students and special interest groups on the topic: Crafting a Compelling Career Brand

How to Develop Your Career Brand

Start by answering the following questions:

Question 1:  What skills do you most enjoy using?

Over the years, you’ve probably amassed dozens of skills. The key here is to distill them down to just a couple of main selling points that will tell prospective employers that you know your stuff. Be honest and authentic about what your strengths truly are.

As Pamela Rucker of the CIO Executive Council put it: "People need to find out what those one or two things are and then define themselves.” For instance, perhaps you are particularly adept at project management. This might make you especially valuable to a prospective employer who is seeking expertise in that area.

Question 2:  What work do you want to attract more of in your career? 

It’s easy to focus on what you don’t want, but this will only generate more of the same. It does nothing to propel you forward. Instead, focus on the job and/or work duties that energize you.  For example, do you enjoy turning around underperforming operations, or resolving complex procurement problems, or working with a specific type of client group? 

Then, add this area of interest and expertise to your career branding statement to clarify what you want more of so your network can respond by providing leads regarding upcoming projects, job vacancies, clients who need your services, networking contacts and more.  Need help answering this question? Check out my article 4 C’s to getting ‘unstuck’.

Question 3:  What influence or impact do you want to have?

Lastly, figure out what type of impact you want your work to have on the environment around you. Perhaps you want to create work cultures where people love coming to work. Or maybe you’d like to be a top account manager or lead an organization to achieve industry awards. 

Writing Your Career Branding Statement

Use this formula to craft your Career Brand:

"I specialize in using my skills in _____(question 1)_______

to attract ______(question 2) _______________

to impact (OR) influence ___________(question 3)________.

So, using myself as a Career Coach as an example, my statement would look something like this:  “I specialize in using my coaching skills, and job search and career advancement expertise to attract professionals who are job searching or feeling stuck in their careers and help them to build rewarding and highly engaging careers.”

Remember, your career brand needs to be clear, concise and to the point.  Avoid fancy jargon or eloquent statements which only confuse the listener.  Really want to ensure your branding statement works?  Try it out on your mentor or a trusted advisor.  If they don’t readily understand what you do, go back to the blackboard and simplify. 

Finally, remember, everything else out there – the job listings, your present and future colleagues, the prospective employers – all of those things already exist. The one thing that doesn’t is how you will position yourself and differentiate yourself. That is where your career brand statement comes into play.

Author: Joanne Loberg of JL Careers Inc. is a Certified Executive Coach and Internationally Certified Career Management Professional.  She has a reputation as a highly sought after Career Consultant and she has been referred to as "an absolute expert at navigating the complex territory of career advancement.” Joanne provides leadership coaching as well as career transition coaching, career planning workshops, and job search services (resumes, LinkedIn profiles, cover letters, and interview practice) for Professionals and Executives. Copyright 2018 JL Careers Inc. All rights reserved.

Wishing you much career success!

Joanne Loberg
Certified Executive Coach & Internationally Certified Career Management Professional
JL Careers Inc

What to Do When You are Overqualified for the Posted Job

Vancouver-based JL Careers provides career management and leadership strategies for Executives and Professionals across North America.

As a media contributor Joanne Loberg shares her insights with Nick Patch of Workopolis on what to do if you are overqualified for a job but really want to work for the organization.  Do you apply and hope for the best, or is there another more effective way to get your foot in the door with this employer?  Read more:  How to land a job when you’re overqualified

If you are interested in JL Careers contributing to a segment on career planning, transition or leadership coaching please contact us.

 

100 Women Who Care

Monday, March 5th at 6pm at Steamworks in Gastown
See how you can be part of positive change.

100Women Vancouver raises $40,000+ a year for local charities in four hours over the course of a year.  100+ women who care about local community causes and who are committed to community service, meet quarterly for one hour.  We jointly select a local charity or not-for-profit organization; then each write a $100 cheque to the selected organization and watch how the group’s commitment turns into a $10,000+ donation.  We do this four times a year and witness how $40,000 can improve the lives of our neighbours when placed in the hands of deserving grass-roots agencies working to serve the local community.

If You:

  • Are committed to helping others in our community but are stretched for time
  • Want to be part of a powerful group of local women making an immediate, direct and positive effect on the lives of our neighbours
  • Want 100% of your donations to go directly to local charity
  • Want to learn more about the many worthy community service programs and organizations servicing Vancouverites.

Join us at our next meeting:  Monday, March 5th, 2018 at 6pm at Steamworks in Gastown

Come early to mingle, eat, drink –
Pre-networking between 5-6pm
Meeting starts promptly at 6-7pm
Post-networking/Cheque Payment between 7-8pm

Register at:  http://www.100womenvan.com/?page_id=22

 

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JL Careers provides Career and Leadership Coaching, Career Development Workshops, and Career Transition Services which support organizational succession planning, leadership development and employee engagement strategies.